The quaint town of Madison is surrounded by the history of our forefathers.    We honor many of the historical highlights throughout our facility, from the Washington Ballroom to the Forbes Tap Room.  The Barn rests 82 feet from the original Braddock Trail.  Built circa 1799 as a dairy farm barn, the barn has been a home, a restaurant, and now has transformed into the elegantly unique venue of today.

Historical Highlights Illustrating The Heritage Of  The Barn At Madison:

On July 9th, 1755, while en-route to capture Fort Duquesne, General Edward Braddock was mortally wounded.  Notable members of his army traveling with him were Lt. Col George Washington, Daniel Boone, and Daniel Morgan.  General Braddock’s troops were surprised by the French and Indians. George Washington spoke at Braddock’s memorial service.

In September of 1758, General John Forbes sent Major Grant to scout Fort Duquesne with the 1st Highland Regiment along what became known as Forbes Road.  Unfortunately,  after engaging with the French andIndians, 850 men were lost and Major Grant was captured.  The rest of the British troops retreated to Fort Ligonier.

By November of 1758, the French and Indians fled from Fort Duquesne and it fell to the British Empire, thereby  named after William Pitt, the British wartime political leader.

Located directly across the street and up the hill from The Barn at Madison was McDowell’s Blockhouse. It served as protection for the colonials from the Indians after the French and Indian War.